Undergraduate Level Courses

Intensive Pastoral English Program

  • In collaboration with the Mexican American Catholic College (MACC).
  • IPE 1640 Beginners Intensive Pastoral English: Grammar & Application
  • IPE 1645 Beginners Intensive Pastoral English: Phonetics & Conversation
  • IPE 2640 Beginners Plus Intensive Pastoral English: Grammar & Application
  • IPE 2645 Beginners Plus Intensive Pastoral English: Phonetics & Conversation
  • IPE 3640 Intermediate Intensive Pastoral English: Grammar & Application
  • IPE 3645 Intermediate Intensive Pastoral English: Phonetics & Conversation
  • IPE 3650 Intermediate Plus Intensive Pastoral English: Grammar & Application
  • IPE 3655 Intermediate Plus Intensive Pastoral English: Phonetics & Conversation
  • IPE 4640 Advanced Intensive Pastoral English: Grammar & Application
  • IPE 4645 Advanced Intensive Pastoral English: Phonetics & Conversation
  • IPE 4650 Advanced Plus Intensive Pastoral English: Grammar & Application
  • IPE 4655 Advanced Plus Intensive Pastoral English: Phonetics & Conversation

Philosophy

  • PL 4138, 4238, 4338 Selected Topics in Philosophy

  • PL 4139, 4239, 4339 Selected Texts in Philosophy
  • PL 4310 The Philosophy of Human Person and Will
  • This course is an introduction to philosophical anthropology in the West. The nature, purpose, and potential of human life as perceived by Ancient Greeks, Scholastics, and modern thinkers are examined. The student considers the relevance of such visions for contemporary concerns.

  • PL 4313 Logic
  • This course will focus on conceptual logic and on the three basic acts of the human mind; namely, apprehension, judgment, and reasoning. The main concern will be with deductive and inductive reasoning. The course will study various forms of fallacious reasoning and different forms of sophistical reasoning.

  • PL 4314 Christian Ethical and Social Philosophy
  • The course studies major themes in the ancient, medieval, modern and contemporary history of Western ethical and social-political thought. The course includes theoretical and practical discussion of conscience, freedom, law, responsibility, virtue and guilt. The impact of political philosophy on Catholic social teaching is also noted.

  • PL 4320 Modern and Political Philosophy
  • The course examines the major epistemological and metaphysical issues from the seventeenth to the nineteenth centuries with a focus on Descartes, Hume, and Kant. The major issues in modern political philosophy are considered through a study of Hobbes, Locke, and Marx. The course includes critical discussions of related issues.

  • PL 4322 Religious Experience and the Development of American Thoughts
  • This course will examine the phenomena of religious experience as it develops as a central theme in American thought. The primary question the course will seek to explore will not only be the nature of religious experience, but of all types of human experience since experience itself has become a “root metaphor” in American thought and theology. As the students investigate the central theme of the course, they will also be exposed to many other ideas, debates, conceptual categories and forms of critical discourse that have come to shape and pervade the dominant ethos of American cultural life in this century.

  • PL 4323 History and Method of Christian Thought
  • This course is an overview of the most significant categories, methodologies, and issues of Christian thought as they have developed historically since the first century. From philosophical perspectives with attention to the hermeneutics of such methodologies the course discusses the relationship of philosophy to the sciences generally and to theologies in particular.

  • PL 4326 Ancient and Medieval Philosophy
  • The course is a survey of the history of philosophy in the West from the sixth century B.C. through the thirteenth century A.D. with an emphasis on Plato, Aristotle, Stoicism, Augustine, Bonaventure, Aquinas, and Scotus. The course examines the major problems and themes of the period.

  • PL 4327 Philosophical Foundations of Thomas Aquinas
  • This course will focus on the theological patterns and the underlying philosophical principles of his most famous work, the Summa Theologiae. The course will investigate this work in its key areas and themes. Aquinas’ understanding of God, grace, Christian anthropology, the moral life, the person of Jesus Christ, and the work of the Holy Spirit will be examined; and his significance for contemporary theology and pastoral practice will be explored.

  • PL 4329 Contemporary Philosophy
  • This course will survey the philosophical movements of the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries as they emerged on both the continent and in the United States. It will, then, primarily examine phenomenology, pragmatism, existentialism, analytic philosophy and aesthetics. The course will also investigate some emerging “third-world” philosophers who have had an important impact on theology in the last twenty years.

  • PL 4333 Philosophical Hermeneutics
  • This course examines critically theories of knowledge, past and present; truth, evidence, and certitude. The various criteria of interpretation are considered. Within the confines of hermeneutics as a philosophy of language, the thought of the following thinkers will be studied: Wittgenstein, Heidegger, Schleiermacher, Bultmann, Gadamer, and Ricoeur. Finally, the impact of post-modern thought and issues on hermeneutics is considered.

Religious Studies

  • RS 4125 Rhetoric and Proclamation
  • The course has been designed to assist the student in basic communication skills, theory and practice. This will be achieved by developing talents for public proclamation through articulation practice, vocal exercises, interpreting texts and dramatization for oral proclamation. This course is meant to prepare the student for entrance into the homiletic course work offered by Oblate School of Theology.

  • RS 4130, 4230, 4330 Selected Topics in Religious Studies
  • RS 4214 Liturgical Celebration and Practices
  • This course is an introduction to basic principles, skills and resources which are needed for preparation and celebration of Catholic Liturgy. Participants will become familiar with basic forms and intentions of liturgical prayer by close examination of the various rites for which they are likely to have some responsibility. The course will also provide opportunity to practice liturgical skills.

  • RS 4216 Seminar in Spirituality and Liturgy
  • An introduction to Spirituality and basic liturgical principles. Offered only in Fall semesters.

  • RS 4217 Seminar in Pastoral Ministry
  • An introduction to pastoral skills, includes a four-day live-in experience. Offered only in Spring semesters. A special seminar for presbyteral candidates designed to provide for the integration of philosophical and theological studies with their personal and ministerial formation.

  • RS 4312 Survey of Basic Theology I
  • An introduction to contemporary theology in the areas of Scripture, Discipleship and Conversion, Ecclesiology, and Ministry. Offered only in Fall semesters.

  • RS 4313 Survey of Basic Theology II
  • A continuation of Survey I in the areas of Church History, Culture and Religion, Christology, sacraments, and Moral Theology. Offered only in Spring semesters.

  • RS 4315 Catechism of the Catholic Church I
  • This course will examine the first two parts of the Catechism. These sections include the profession of faith and the celebration of the sacraments. Also included will be discussions on the Sacred Liturgy and the Church.

  • RS 4316 Catechism of the Catholic Church II
  • This course will examine the third part of the Catechism. This will include an introduction to the moral life, the practice of virtue, and an introduction to social justice. Part four which addresses one’s prayer life is covered in the course dealing with the introduction to the spiritual life.

  • RS 4320/RS 4321 Spirituality and Spiritual Traditions I, II
  • A working definition of spirituality will be identified. Areas that assist or inhibit spiritual growth will be reviewed. The current understanding of how humang rowth affects spiritual growth will be studied. The concept of the desert as it has evolved and its place in current spirituality will be reviewed. In addition, the course will examine how spirituality impacts our concept of time, sports, addiction, and sexuality. The importance of spirituality in discernment, architecture and liturgy will be studied.

  • RS 4330 Teaching of the Church: Vatican Council II
  • This course is an introduction to the official teaching of the Church using the documents of Vatican II, 1962-65. The goal is to examine key documents and examine the theological issues that relate to current Church teaching. Paul VI, in his address to Cardinal Pizzardo regarding the Conciliar documents on the Opening of the International Congress on the Theology of Vatican II, September 21, 1966, in AAS, 59 (1966) wrote: “. . . should be thought of as an impulse to a new journey, not as a goal achieved.”.